BOFCA 2021 Awards

BEST PICTURE
THE POWER OF THE DOG

Benedict Cumberbatch looking out across a prairie in the movie The Power of the Dog

BEST DIRECTOR
Jane Campion, THE POWER OF THE DOG

Jane Campion sitting outside at a mobile workstation reviewing footage for the movie The Power of the Dog

BEST ACTOR
Benedict Cumberbatch, THE POWER OF THE DOG

Benedict Cumberbatch looks angry in the western The Power of the Dog

BEST ACTRESS
Kristen Stewart, SPENCER

Kristen Stewart wears a veil looking forlorn and looking out the window in the movie Spencer

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Kodi Smit-McPhee, THE POWER OF THE DOG

Kodi Smit-McPhee looks inquisitively at some kind of paper device in the movie The Power of the Dog

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Kirsten Dunst, THE POWER OF THE DOG

Kirsten Dunst looks to the right with a sad expression in The Power of the Dog

BEST SCREENPLAY
Jane Campion, THE POWER OF THE DOG

Kristen Dunst and Kodi Smit-McPhee sit in an old car while director Jane Campion talks to them

BEST ENSEMBLE
LICORICE PIZZA

Cooper Hoffman and Alana Haim look at each other intently in the movie Licorice Pizza

BEST SCORE
Hans Zimmer, DUNE

Hans Zimmer sits next to Denis Villeneuve holding a microphone and talking about the movie Dune at a NYFF Q&A

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Ari Wegner, THE POWER OF THE DOG

Cinematographer Ari Wegner kneels down to check the camera while setting up a shot in for The Power of the Dog

BEST EDITING
Joe Walker, DUNE

Director Denis Villeneuve talks to editor Joe Walker on the set of Dune

BEST DOCUMENTARY
FLEE

An animated man puts his hand on the back of his head and looks deep in thought in the documentary Flee

BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM
THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD

Renate Reinsve looks happy as she runs down a busy road in the movie The Worst Person in the World

BEST ANIMATED FILM
THE MITCHELLS VS. THE MACHINES

A family is driving in a car with various looks of terror and excitement with their dog on the hood of the car in the animated film The Mitchells vs The Machines

TOP TEN FILMS OF 2021
1. THE POWER OF THE DOG
2. LICORICE PIZZA
3. THE GREEN KNIGHT
4. DRIVE MY CAR
5. PIG
6. DUNE
7. TITANE
8. THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD
9. SPENCER
10. FLEE

BOFCA REVIEW ROUNDUP: 12/10/2021

Nicole Kidman and Javier Bardem stand embracing each other in the movie Being the RicardosBEING THE RICARDOS

“It’s a wonderful tribute to an era and the personalities responsible for I LOVE LUCY, an iconic sitcom, with the principals capturing the spirit of the real performers even if they only suggest them in looks.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

Riz Ahmed sits in a dark car looking out in the movie EncounterENCOUNTER

“In totally subverting its initial premise, it may cause some viewers to disengage from the story at precisely the moment they should be most involved.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

Lucy Hale and Austin Stowell stand akwardly in an elevator looking at each other in the movie The Hating GameTHE HATING GAME

“While far from perfect, it’s the sort of entertaining genre entry which audiences once took for granted.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

 

A colored image of Charlie Chaplin standing next to the title of the documentary "The Real Charlie Chaplin"THE REAL CHARLIE CHAPLIN

“The items the filmmakers choose to emphasize sometimes borders on the bizarre.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

 

Sandra Bullock is pressed up against glass by a prison officer in the movie The UnforgivableTHE UNFORGIVABLE

“One senses that the people behind THE UNFORGIVABLE wanted to make this a moving statement about family and justice and social class, but the result is what a pencil sketch is to an oil painting.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

 

A STATEMENT FROM BOFCA ON SCREENING SAFETY AND SCREENER ACCESS

The Boston Online Film Critics Association (BOFCA)’s membership wishes to extend their gratitude to studios and distributors for granting us opportunities to watch their movies through in-person screenings, remote viewing links, and DVD screeners. During the end-of-year bustle, this access is critical for us to watch the movies that we’re assigned to cover by our outlets and to catch up on those we missed throughout the year ahead of our awards voting. It’s customary that screeners go out for awards season, and while that custom has always been greatly appreciated, it means much more now in this phase of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We acknowledge these opportunities as a kindness and not as our right.

However, we must also present our concerns about screener access and safety protocols for in-person screenings outside of awards season. Film journalism is a year-round job and while we truly value the access granted during the last two months of the year, and respect the hard work that goes into maintaining it, that access has proven essential for the pandemic’s duration—in context with COVID-19 and for the profession at large.

Regarding COVID-19: It’s true that vaccines are available and effective. However, vaccination alone isn’t enough protection for some of us, given the possibility of breakthrough infections. The assumption that everyone can mask up and return to the theaters is false; there are those of us who can take that risk and others for whom returning to theaters simply can’t fit into their calculus. Some of us live with unvaccinated children. Others have family members living with terminal illnesses or medical conditions that make them more vulnerable to COVID-19 or live with said illnesses or conditions themselves. Wearing a mask in crowded indoor public spaces for any amount of time, much less two hours, is an unreasonable and unnecessary risk for critics to whom any of these statements apply.

It means the world to us that either proof of vaccination or a recent negative COVID test is required for screening attendance (in addition to masks). But these measures aren’t always adhered to with consistency from one distributor to another, or even from one screening to another. This makes returning to in-person screenings a greater gamble for the most vulnerable members of our group and our community as a whole.

Thus, we urge distributors to put into effect the following rules of attendance as we head toward the end of 2021 and into 2022, from awards season and beyond: 1) require proof of vaccination, booster included if eligible or available, or a recent negative COVID test for anyone, be they press, publicists, security, or the general public, who means to attend an in-person screening; 2) require that all attendees at such screenings wear masks; and 3) provide remote viewing/screener access to accommodate journalists with high-risk factors, or disabilities, or for occasions when journalists cannot meet the requirements for in-person attendance. We ask that these policies remain in effect for the remainder of the pandemic and that at-home digital or physical screener access should continue to be provided for journalists with disabilities even after the pandemic ends, as a concession to accessibility issues that existed before COVID-19.

To further serve journalists with disabilities now and in the future, and to make their viewing experiences more equitable, we also request that studios and distributors consistently provide screener links with subtitles. Most screener links do not include the option to turn on subtitles, which we feel is unfair to journalists with hearing and auditory processing difficulties, who would benefit from them, and whose experience reviewing the films is impacted by their lack of availability.

We make these requests in good faith on behalf of our Boston-based and New England-based membership, as well as on behalf of film journalists everywhere who would benefit from them. We would also like to extend our thanks to the Los Angeles Film Critics Association and Scott Renshaw, film critic for Salt Lake City Weekly and president of the Utah Film Critics Association, who drafted statements that provided much of the language and ideas on which this one was based; and we would like to thank Kristen Lopez, TV editor for IndieWire, for her critical reporting on the health, safety, and accessibility concerns of film critics.

About The Boston Online Film Critics Association (BOFCA)

Founded in 2012, the Boston Online Film Critics Association aims to provide professional support, networking opportunities, and greater visibility for Boston-area film critics representing digitally-based, non-traditional outlets and platforms. Because of its unique perspective, the Boston Online Film Critics Association has become well-known for its often unexpected, “outside the box” picks. Previous Best Picture winners have included Parasite, Mad Max: Fury Road, You Were Never Really Here, Get Out, and Snowpiercer.

BOFCA maintains an updated website for signal-boosting the work of its members, and sharing news, updates, and its yearly awards which will be released this year on December 11, 2021, at www.bofca.com. Its leadership can be reached for questions, comments, and other information via email at bostononlinefilmcritics@gmail.com.

BOFCA REVIEW ROUNDUP: 12/03/2021

A woman in a wheelchair wheels herself down a hallway while looking over her shoulder suspiciously in the movie The Advent CalendarADVENT CALENDAR

“For those (like this reviewer) who aren’t Christian, THE ADVENT CALENDAR takes something unfamiliar and turns it into an instrument of horror. For those familiar with such devices, it provides a macabre twist on a holiday tradition.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

A group of friends and their children sit around a Christmas dinner table, raising their glasses to toast to each other in the movie Silent Night.SILENT NIGHT

“In the glut of holiday-themed movies it’s really hard to stand out, but there’s no question SILENT NIGHT will never be confused with other holiday movies, even ones with “Silent Night” in their title.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

 

BOFCA REVIEW ROUNDUP: 11/26/2021

Halle Berry has her hands up ready to fight in the movie BruisedBRUISED

“There doesn’t seem to be any strong point-of-view with Berry, as director, never really conveying why she’s telling us this story.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

 

Cary Elwes drapes a blanket around Brooke Shields in the movie A Castle for ChristmasA CASTLE FOR CHRISTMAS

“You may not remember the details of “A Castle for Christmas” a month from now, but if you’re looking for something to watch while eating leftovers, it should do the trick.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

Mirabelle holds a basket full of pinwheels and other things in the Disney movie EncantoENCANTO

“…while not likely to be marked as a modern classic, it is a charming fairy tale that should entertain viewers of all ages.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies

 

 

Lady Gaga as Patrizia Reggiani holds up her hand to flash a ring in the movie House of GucciHOUSE OF GUCCI

“Filled with period music of the ‘70s and ‘80s when the story takes place, it plays like the soap operas of the period which the real story may have served as inspiration for, like “Dallas” and “Dynasty.” – Daniel M. Kimmel, North Shore Movies